Olive Oil Cake From Maialino in NYC

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If you’re looking for something sweet to pair with your slow-roasted strawberries, look no further! Maialino’s olive oil cake recipe is sure to please any crowd while being one of the most accessible cakes to bake without using butter!

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and lightly oil a 9-inch cake pan before using a large bowl to mix flour, sugars, salt, baking soda, and baking powder.

Extra virgin olive oil

If you’re craving an aromatic olive oil cake, look no further! Maialino in NYC’s recipe from Maialino Cafe is among the most discussed on TikTok and ranks first when searching “best olive oil cake.” It uses milk and Grand Marnier in addition to flour, sugar, and eggs; additionally, it boasts an increased ratio of olive oil compared with other recipes and calls for lemon zest and juice for maximum aroma!

Olive oil is a liquid vegetable fat derived from the seeds of certain plants, such as olives and palm trees. It is used as a cooking oil and is known for its health benefits. It is increasingly being added to beauty products.

This Maialino Olive Oil Cake recipe is easy and requires just one bowl for the preparation of the batter. Similar to Cook’s Illustrated version, but using more olive oil, milk, and Grand Marnier. Impress your friends and family with this impressive dessert! It won’t disappoint.

Flour

Contrary to most olive oil cakes, which tend to use just flour and leavening agents as ingredients, this one calls for both butter and olive oil in equal proportions, along with whole eggs instead of egg whites, in order to seed its batter with tiny air pockets that contribute to its light texture when baked.

Maialino’s recipe for butter cake is easy and requires just three ingredients and no mixer for baking. In fact, it takes half the time of traditional butter cakes and can even be prepared quickly using a food processor – creating an airy and fluffy cake perfect for serving without needing anything more than powdered sugar!

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and grease or spray a 9-inch cake pan that is at least 2 inches deep with nonstick spray or greasing. Whisk the dry ingredients (flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder). Whisk the wet ingredients (olive oil, milk, eggs, orange zest and juice, Grand Marnier). Combine dry with wet and stir well to combine before pouring your batter into your prepared pan and baking for approximately one hour, or until its top is golden and a tester comes out clean.

Sugar

If you’re looking for an easy, delicious olive oil cake recipe with minimal preparation time, look no further than Maialino in NYC. Their version features both lightness and structure with its crisp crust and aromatic oil-rich center; its secret lies within whipped eggs, which infuse the batter with tiny air bubbles for an even fine-crumbed texture that’s both airy and firm at once – quite similar to Kylie Jenner’s recipe from Tik Tok (though different proportions; second highest being King Arthur).

This one-bowl recipe requires minimal ingredients to create an impressive treat that’s sure to please. Whisk together olive oil, milk, eggs, orange zest and juice, Grand Marnier, and flour before stirring in dry ingredients, including sugar, salt, and baking soda powder. Pour your batter into a pan before placing it in the oven until golden in color with clean cake tester insertion. Allow it to cool before dusting with powdered sugar and topping it with vanilla-orange whipped mascarpone for the ultimate wow factor – sure to impress friends, family, coworkers, or coworkers alike.

Baking soda

Baking soda is an indispensable kitchen ingredient, from baking and cleaning to neutralizing odors and relieving heartburn symptoms naturally. Many of us keep an ARM & HAMMER box on hand as an everyday essential for household needs and natural heartburn remedies – as well as an excellent natural way to relieve nausea during pregnancy! Additionally, baking soda can even whiten teeth and freshen breath! But how much do we know about this seemingly innocuous ingredient?

Baking soda’s main component, sodium bicarbonate, reacts with acidic ingredients such as lemon juice, vinegar, and buttermilk to produce carbon dioxide bubbles that aid batters and doughs in rising. (It’s the same reaction that caused your volcano project in grade school to fizz!) Upon baking, these bubbles become trapped and expand as part of the mixture itself to form light and fluffy cakes and cookies.

Baking soda alone cannot rise the same as when combined with another acid (such as cream of tartar or cornstarch). When baking with only baking soda, however, additional acidic ingredients ( such as fruit juice or yogurt ) need to be carefully considered; too much baking soda could compromise its flavor, while not enough would result in insufficient rising.

Orange zest

While most olive oil cakes can be prepared in just one bowl using flour, learners, and sugar along with olive oil as ingredients, this one requires using a stand mixer and techniques reminiscent of chiffon cake making to achieve an even, fine crumb – using whole eggs to seed the batter with tiny air bubbles for evenness of crumb and an airy crumb surface resulting in a light cake that needs no frosting but can be finished off with powdered sugar dusting for decoration.

Maialino Restaurant of New York City provides this recipe, serving it both breakfast in muffin form and on their Valentine’s menu featuring heirloom citrus segments and pomegranate seeds for decoration.

Preheat the oven to 350F, spray a 9-inch cake pan with nonstick baking spray, and line it with parchment paper. Whisk together flour, salt, baking soda, and powder; in another bowl, whisk eggs, milk, orange zest and juice, Grand Marnier, and allspice; add wet ingredients to dry ingredients while stirring continuously until no flour remains visible in the batter. Pour batter into prepared pan by tapping it against the counter several times in order to eliminate air bubbles; bake until top is golden-brown in color and cake tester comes out clean after 1 hour; cool before serving!

Orange juice

Orange juice is an excellent natural source of Vitamin C and folate. Additionally, its potassium content helps prevent kidney stones and reduce the risk of heart disease. Furthermore, flavonoids found in orange juice may also help lower risk. Nonetheless, consumption should be limited; orange juice can contain high amounts of sugar and calories and should not be consumed by people with diabetes or kidney problems.

Orange juice cannot generally be sold as 100% fruit juice due to EU directive restrictions limiting sugar, preservatives, stabilizers, or flavorings being added. A glass of “not from concentrate” orange juice typically contains juice from one or two medium-sized oranges; its water and natural sugar content also depends on how much pulp there is present.

Unpasteurized orange juice may contain bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella due to poor sanitation at its production facility. One Salmonella outbreak resulted in 153 cases across 23 states due to failure to clean equipment properly or follow a HACCP plan properly.

Grand Marnier

Grand Marnier is a Cognac-based orange-flavored liqueur created in 1880 by Alexandre Marnier-Lapostolle and consumed either neat or mixed drinks. Its distinctive flavor combines vanilla and orange notes that are balanced out by its cognac base, often used in cocktails and desserts, as well as being a key component in iconic French dessert Crepes Suzette.

This spirit is produced using brandy distilled from Ugni Blanc grapes harvested from five Cognac crus and features Orange Citrus Bigaradia notes for its distinct tropical flair. Cultivated in West Indies climates with intense floral perfume notes, its combination with refined French cognac yields a rich and complex liquid that ages in oak casks for 6-8 months before reaching the market.

Cesar Ritz proposed that Louis-Alexandre change the trending behavior in Paris at that time by opting for “Grand,” which conveyed a sense of distinction. Patrick Raguenaud followed this original recipe to craft Quintessence, which celebrated cognac and Bigaradia orange as ingredients of its finest expression.